Endwell (NY) Fire Department Replaces Aerial with Sutphen SPH 100 Aerial Platform
endwell fire department

By Alan M. Petrillo

Endwell (NY) Fire Department was running a 1993 Sutphen SP 95 aerial platform that was at the end of its useful life, so the department knew it was time to spec out a new truck. The department wanted to tailor its new truck to its specific needs and again turned to Sutphen to get what it wanted.

“We got to the point with our old truck where we had maintenance issues, and electrical issues that were difficult to pinpoint,” says Mike Battaglini, Endwell’s chief. “We knew it was time to get a new truck. We wanted a truck that we could tailor to how we do things, and Sutphen was accommodating in that regard.”

Nick Catalino, sales manager for Vander Molen Fire Apparatus Sales and Service, who sold the SPH 100 to Endwell, notes that the Endwell crew told him they were well satisfied with the performance of their previous Sutphen truck, and wanted to see what new offerings Sutphen had. “We brought a demo unit to Endwell and were able to do some personalized training with them on the truck,” Catalino says. “We took it to a building they couldn’t reach with their previous truck and found that it performed perfectly. We also ran it around their district, which has a number of hills, and determined we needed a large motor in it.”

The Endwell SPH 100 has a Hale Qmax 2,000-gpm pump, and a 300-gallon water tank.

The end result is a Sutphen SPH 100 foot aerial platform built on a Sutphen Monarch heavy duty custom chassis with a 62-inch extended four-door flat-roof cab with seating for six firefighters, five in SCBA (self contained breathing apparatus) seats, and 10-inch double Domex 110,000-psi (pounds per square inch) frame rails. Catalino says the body is No. 304 Huckbolted stainless steel, with hinged compartment doors, and more than 280 cubic feet of compartment space with compartments being 56-inches high on both sides of the truck.

The Sutphen SPH 100 is powered by a 600-hp Cummins X 15 diesel engine, and an Allison 4500 EVS Gen 5 automatic transmission.

The truck has a 24,000-pound front axle and suspension, a 52,000-pound rear axle and suspension, and is powered by a 600-horsepower Cummins X 15 diesel engine, and an Allison 4500 EVS Gen 5 automatic transmission, with a Leece Neville 420-amp alternator.

The truck’s platform has two Task Force Tips Monsoon 1,250-gpm monitors, one electric and one manual.

Catalino notes that the truck’s wheelbase is 236 inches, it’s overall length is 46 feet 10 inches, and its overall height is 11 feet 6 inches. “The truck has a Hale Qmax 2,000-gallon per minute (gpm) single stage pump, a 300-gallon water tank, two 1-3/4-inch cross lays, one 2-1/2-inch cross lay, two 2-1/2-inch discharges on the left side, and one 3-inch and one 2-1/2-inch discharge on the right side,” he says.

The front of the truck has a grill-mounted Federal Q2B mechanical siren, a Whelen Freedom IV LED 72-inch light bar, and a Fire Tech LED 12-volt 80-inch brow light.

Battaglini points out that the truck’s hose bed carries 800 feet of 4-inch LDH (large diameter hose), and the platform has two Task Force Tips Monsoon 1,250-gpm monitors, one remote-controlled electric with a TFT VUM (valve under monitor, two panel controllers and a wireless controller; and the other a manual monitor with TFT stacked tips and XF-SS10 stream straightener.

Endwell firefighters use the truck’s two monitors during a training exercise. (Photos 6-7 courtesy of Endwell Fire Department)

The 121-foot ground ladder package on the truck includes a 35-foot two-section extension ladder, a 30-foot two-section extension ladder, two 16-foot roof ladders, a 14-foot roof ladder, and a 10-foot attic ladder. Battaglini notes that the truck has a grill-mounted Federal Q2B mechanical siren, a wired Firecom 5100D single radio six-position intercom system, an 8-kW hydraulic generator, 150 feet of electric cord on a Hannay electric reel, and a FRC inView TrueSight single camera system.

The Endwell SPH 100 sets up at a recent night-time call.

Lighting on the truck, Battaglini says, includes Whelen LED warning lighting, a Whelen Freedom IV LED 72-inch light bar, Whelen Mini Freedom IV LED 21-inch light bars, a Fire Tech LED 12-volt 80-inch single brow light, Fire Tech LED 12-volt  27-inch scene lights, and Fire Research LED Spectra 240-volt Tele Lights. “This truck is able to completely light up a scene by itself,” Battaglini observes.

See also  Sutphen Delivers SLR 75 Aerial Ladder to East Haddam (CT) Fire Department

Author

  • ALAN M. PETRILLO is a Tucson, Ariz.-based journalist, the author of three novels and five non-fiction books, and a member of the Fire Apparatus & Emergency Equipment editorial advisory board. He served 22 years with Verdoy (NY) Fire Department, including the position of chief.

Topics

The end result is a Sutphen SPH 100 foot aerial platform built on a Sutphen Monarch heavy duty custom chassis with a 62-inch extended four-door flat-roof cab.

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